Companies Who Remove Negative Information From Google: What You Should Know

Companies Who Remove Negative Internet Content: What To Know (Transcription)

Mike:

Our topic today is what you should know about companies who offer removal services for content published on the internet. Can you tell me a little bit about what types of guarantees that companies who are trying to remove internet content for you, what do they typically tell you?

Matt:

Yeah, you’re starting to see a lot more of potential clients reaching out like company X, Y gave me a guaranteed removal. Which is really cool in the sense that they’re being honest and you don’t have to pay them unless you’re successful, which is how it should be. But the problem is people want these leads, they don’t want them to say, we can’t remove this but hey, we got other services called suppression. So it seems like they’re trying to build a rapport, build trust by saying we can remove this and they say they can remove anything, they never say they can’t. So you get them in the door, you build a rapport with them. You waste two months of their life trying to remove something, then when you can’t then they upsell you on the suppression service. It’s a waste of time. There’s certain things that can be removed and certain things that can’t, and it’s pretty straightforward.

Matt:

There’s no magic bullet to remove a news article. The only way you can file DMCA, you can ask nicely, you can ask for a nofollow code, but there is no magic bullet out there that just pluck out news articles. With complaint sites there are, a lot of them are just extortions you to pay them a fee. Some you can report to Google for extortion and Google will remove that. Private information can be removed easily. There’s certain things that we know that are removable and they are not. And these companies know it too, but again, they just want you in their door.

Mike:

So you mentioned a couple things there, like complaint sites. So you have a relationship with some complaint sites, they’re an extortionist. Then doesn’t really just become a matter of how much the company’s going to mark up the removal?

Matt:

Exactly. Yeah. A lot of these extortion sites, won’t publicly advertise that they’ll remove something for fee, they want to keep their integrity. So they go through third party companies like us to create a buffer. So some of them you can reach out directly and they’ll remove it. Some will say, no, we don’t do removals, but they actually do.

Mike:

Yeah. So in terms of like an advice for like an individual or a small business owner who they’ve got something published, whether it’s a news article or whatever it is, they want to get it removed. They go to one of these companies offering a guaranteed removal service, what should they be asking? In addition to getting a price for that, like what kind of questions should they be asking?

Matt:

If it’s a deindex or removal. A removal will imply the whole page is deleted. A deindex means it might still exist but it won’t be found. So if you Google search that person’s name pages 1 through 10, it won’t be there but the page technically still exists. Essentially the same end result, just different process. Guarantees, how long they will guarantee it for. What if the person who wrote the complaint writes a new one, is that covered or not? Because the person who writes the complaint might just do it again if they knew it says deleted. Those are all good questions.

Mike:

And then what about degree of certainty? I mean, if someone says, oh yeah, it’s going to be $10,000 to take this article down. We’ll guarantee it. You’ll only pay if we get it taken down. If we don’t get it taken down, you owe us nothing. But you’ve wasted, like you said, two months, that’s probably a minimum. I mean, should they be asking for what’s your degree of confidence that you can get this thing removed?

Matt:

Sure. That’s a great question. Yeah. If they say 80% or less, that’d be skeptical. That means 50-50 and they’re just going to wing it. If they’re 100% [inaudible 00:04:10] knows they’re telling the truth. I think also a good question is too, what’s the time limit? Because you don’t want to sign a contract for six months and then you’re kind of holding out hope, but the end of the day, they know they’re not going to be successful. So you should probably try to cap in one to two months. In my experience, if you haven’t gotten removed within two months it’s never coming down.

Mike:

Yeah. Well there are a lot of different ways to get content off the internet as we know and I think we can probably break those down in separate videos. But this has been really helpful. I think if you’re an individual and you have negative content on the internet, it sounds like most of the time suppression is the way to go.

Matt:

That’s the backup option but usually the priority of removing it just not possible. It’s possible, I know a way. But sometimes there’s just dead ends.

Mike:

Yeah. All right. Great. Thanks a lot, Matt.

Matt:

Pleasure Mike, talk to you later.

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